Helping Honduras …


It’s a Wrap (Unpacking)
June 12, 2016, 11:23 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

We have been home a week now.  I finally unpacked on Wednesday and did some laundry.  Finished laundry on Friday.  I never quite believe how much laundry I do just before and again just after a Honduras trip.

I also did some mental/emotional/spiritual unpacking this week.  I realized that the pharmacy could run quite well without me.  That was especially important the second day I had to miss work.  Fretting about how things were going in the pharmacy would not have helped me get through the muscle spasms in my back.  It also made me appreciate my team more.

I had learned humility.  Although my back was much better on Saturday, the spasms were still there, and I had limited range of motion.  I had to ask people to pick up anything I happened to drop and had to ask someone to pull medicine from the bottom shelf for me.

I had learned that my friends are even better people than I had realized.  I do not accept sympathy very well.  My friends and team mates must have sensed that.  No open offers of sympathy.  Instead, I received gentle hugs, offers of prayer, and offers to fetch things I needed (crackers and club soda while I was recovering from the GI virus or medicine while I was suffering from the back spasms).  People are good!

I had learned that I could ask for prayer when I really needed it, and then I learned that I could accept heartfelt prayers from people I did not know.  (The two prayers warriors to whom I had sent notes cast their nets wide — I received prayers by email from people on several continents!)

It was a great week.  The medical clinic saw more than 540 patients. Most of them received medicines from the pharmacy.  The dental clinic treated more than 85 people, relieving a lot of pain.  The construction people helped with a lot of prep work for the second storey of the new church in Copán (tying rebar, hauling cement blocks), and they were able to see the walls begin to go up.  The education team worked in very hot conditions to share the love of our Lord with dozens of Honduran children, through stories, games, and crafts.  I was sorry to miss a couple of days, but each evening at reflections, I learned what others had done that day.  With a small team (fewer then 30 people, everyone had to pull together and to step in to help each other.  I saw lots of that during the week.

We could not have accomplished all we did without the help of many people from the communities we served: Padre Hector Madrid, dean of the Maya Deanery; Deacon Concepción from the church in Santa Rita (site of clinics and education activities); Deacon Carlos from the church in Copán (construction site); Dunia, translator and our friend of many years; Doctora Sury, Honduran doctor and friend of Dunia; our translators from Mayatan Bilingual School in Copán; and the volunteers from the parish in Santa Rita, who helped with initial steps of checking in patients.  It was a great week.


Now, finally, I have photos to share:

First morning in zoo furans. San Pedro Sula. Scott preparing for the day.

First morning in Honduras.  San Pedro Sula. Scott preparing for the day.


Scott and Larry in line, ready to check out ar PriceSmart (Honduran equivalent of Costco) in San Pedro Sula.

Scott and Larry in line, ready to check out at PriceSmart (Honduran equivalent of Costco) in San Pedro Sula.


Passageway leading to our room at the Hotel Marina Copán.

Passageway leading to our room at the Hotel Marina Copán.


Hotel pool.

Hotel pool in the cool of the evening.


Peopled in line, waiting to see a doctor or dentist. Or both!

Peopled in line, waiting to see a doctor or dentist. Or both!


Larry and Audrey handling medical and dental intake. They talked to everyone.

Larry and Audrey handling medical and dental intake. They talked to everyone.


Nurses Darlene and Clare Anne with patients.

Nurses Darlene and Clare Anne with patients.


Nurse Meg in the foreground, assessing a patient.

Nurse Meg in the foreground, assessing a patient.


Doctor Jonathan (far table) and Doctora Sury talking with patients, sometimes an entire family at once. Our American docs were assisted by teenage translators from a bilingual school in Copán.

Doctor Jonathan (far table) and Doctora Sury talking with patients, sometimes an entire family at once. Our American docs were assisted by teenage translators from a bilingual school in Copán.


Dentist Lauren and assistant Alexa with a patient.

Dentist Lauren and assistant Alexa with a patient.


Baskets full of pills: antibiotics, analgesics, cold/allergy medicines, anti-hypertensives, and medicines to treat diabetes, parasites, fungus.

Baskets full of pills: antibiotics, analgesics, cold/allergy medicines, anti-hypertensives, and medicines to treat diabetes, parasites, fungus.


Claudette working in the pharmacy.

Claudette working in the pharmacy.  On this side of the room we had topicals, eye and ear medications, liquids, and vitamins.


Late mornings and late afternoons, Scott added pharmacy gatekeeper to his duties.

Late mornings and late afternoons, Scott added pharmacy gatekeeper to his duties.


Deacon Concepción and soon-to-be SAMS missionary David.

Deacon Concepción and soon-to-be SAMS missionary David.


View from the construction site.

View from the construction site.


Fr. Chris leading Morning Prayer.

Fr. Chris leading Morning Prayer.



Miuri, our tour guide at Macaw Mountain.

Miuri, our tour guide at Macaw Mountain.

A beautiful parrot that seemed to want to have its picture taken.

A beautiful parrot that seemed to want to have its picture taken.

This lovely toucan was close enough to touch. The size of his beak dissuaded me.

This lovely toucan was close enough to touch. The size of his beak dissuaded me.

Scott with blue and green guacamayas (macaws). One of them has his eye on Scott's har.

Scott with blue and green guacamayas (macaws). The green one has his eye on Scott’s hat.


Scarlet guacamaya added.

Scarlet guacamaya added for the full effect.  Scott now treasures this shirt — there are holes in the left sleeve, a gift from the blue guacamaya.


The eight prodigal bags

The eight prodigal bags.  These did not arrive with our flight from Houston.  Larry and I retrieved them the next morning.

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